field service reporting

Understanding Field Service Reports Part 2: Capacitors and Fans

In part 2 of our blog series on field service reports we will cover capacitors, what they do, and what to look for. The capacitor in a UPS is used to store an electric charge, as well as smoothing out and filtering voltage fluctuations. UPS systems vary significantly in design and technology, and as a result, the quantity and size of capacitors changes as well. In addition, because a capacitor replacement typically requires a shutdown of the UPS system for replacement, your UPS service provider likely will recommend and replace the cooling fans in the system at the same time. Both capacitors and fans are critical to keeping the UPS running, and both are just as susceptible to failure as the other components of a UPS. It is critical to understand how each component can be damaged, and what to look for in your field service report (FSR) regarding the health of your capacitors and fans. Continue reading “Understanding Field Service Reports Part 2: Capacitors and Fans” »

What Happens When Your UPS System Fails

What Happens When Your UPS System Fails

Prevention is key to keeping a catastrophic event from occurring in your equipment. Not only can failure cause your equipment to disrupt your workflow, and can cost your company time and money, but having your UPS catch on fire is far worse than a small amount of downtime. We’ll show you what can happen to a rogue UPS system.

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How UPS capacitor failure can creep up on a facility manager.

The Slow but Certain Threat: UPS Capacitor Failure

When a UPS suffers a capacitor failure, you may not initially notice, but that doesn’t mean the UPS hasn’t been compromised and that performance isn’t affected. In many cases, a capacitor failure will force your UPS system into bypass, leaving your critical loads unprotected. Here’s how to detect – and avoid – UPS capacitor failure.

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